Recent Posts

Sensing Water in your Home you Can't See

12/12/2019 (Permalink)

Even small water damages have the potential to cause serious structural and indoor  air quality  issues over time.

The key to avoiding costly future restoration is to handle every water problem as a real threat to your property. SERVPRO of East Monroe County has the equipment, training and experience to find and dry unseen water before secondary damages occur. The proper equipment makes a measurable difference in reducing the damage expense during a fire or water loss. When time matters, technology and equipment must be counted on to perform. SERVPRO® of East Monroe County will answer your call with fast action and a full arsenal of drying equipment. Here are a few of the tools used by your local SERVPRO® Franchise Professionals.

  • Moisture Sensors are used to detect moisture in carpets, baseboards and Moisture Meters (pictured) are used to determine the actual moisture content of various materials. The moisture tester provides accurate readings, allowing SERVPRO® Franchise Professionals to monitor the drying process.
  • Thermohygrometers measure temperature and relative humidity. When armed with this information, SERVPRO® of East Monroe County can calculate and create an environment most conclusive to drying.
  • When facing a contaminated water loss, it is not only important to dry the structure, but the structure must also be disinfected and often deodorized.
  • Ultra-Low-Volume (ULV) Foggers will atomize liquid deodorizing agents, producing a fine mist that can easily penetrate the site where odor-causing residues may accumulate. This device can also be used to inject fungicides and disinfectants into wall cavities and other hard-to-reach
  • Thermal Foggers (pictured) dispense solvent-based produces by creating a dense fog. The fog consists of tiny particles of deodorant solution that attach to and neutralize odor­ causing particles.

What is the bottom line? SERVPRO® of East Monroe County (585-641-0040) has the training and equipment to help make it "Like it never even happened."

Hurricane Season

12/11/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of South-East Monroe County News And Updates

Floods are among the most frequent and costly natural disasters. Conditions that cause floods include heavy or steady rain for several hours or days that saturates the ground. Flash floods occur suddenly due to rapidly rising water along a stream or low-lying area.

Know the Difference
Flood/Flash Flood Watch—Flooding or flash flooding is possible in your area.
Flood/Flash Flood Warning—Flooding or flash flooding is already occurring or will occur soon in your area.

What to do:

Listen to area radio and television stations and a NOAA Weather Radio for possible flood warnings and reports of flooding in progress or other critical
information from the National Weather Service (NWS).
- Be prepared to evacuate at a moment’s notice.
- When a flood or flash flood warning is issued for your area, head for higher ground and stay there.
- Stay away from floodwaters. If you come upon a flowing stream where water is above your ankles, stop, turn around and go another way. Six inches of swiftly moving water can sweep you off of your feet.
- If you come upon a flooded road while driving, turn around and go another way. If you are caught on a flooded road and waters are rising rapidly around you, get out of the car quickly and move to higher ground. Most cars can be swept away by less than two feet of moving water.
- Keep children out of the water. They are curious and often lack judgment about running water or contaminated water.
- Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood danger.
- Because standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding, it’s important to have protection from the floods associated with hurricanes, tropical storms, heavy rains and other conditions that impact the U.S. For more information on flood insurance, please visit the National Flood Insurance Program Web site at www.FloodSmart.gov.

via redcross.org

Add Duct Cleaning to your House Cleaning List

12/10/2019 (Permalink)

Very often, when a fire or smoke damage occurs, the air ducts in your home can be affected. Here is some information on getting them cleaned from Home Advisor: The cost of cleaning your air ducts is determined by the size of your air duct system and the extent of contamination. On average, homeowners spend between $265 and $471, with $352 being the national average.

Did you know that cleaning your ducts and vents can help airflow and increase energy efficiency? According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), keeping your air ducts and vents clear can increase energy efficiency and indoor air quality. While the cost to clean ducts and vents might sound high, the benefits to homeowners?especially those sensitive to allergens?is worth considering.

When looking to have your ducts cleaned, or any other part of your home, for any reason, give SERVPRO® of East Monroe County a call (585-641-0040)! We are here to help you make it "Like it never even happened."

Relocating to Rochester?

12/9/2019 (Permalink)

Maybe you're moving to Rochester to accept a job. Maybe you're doing it to be closer to your family. Or maybe you just want to experience something new. Whatever the case may be, moving out of state can be really intimidating. It can also be a logistical nightmare if you don't make the proper preparations. Fortunately, there are some relatively simple steps you can take to make your move as smooth as possible. Take a look at these 10 tips for moving out of state.

  1. Do as much research on Rochester as you can
  2. Search for a new home
  3. Use the move as an excuse to purge
  4. Pack up the things you're going to move properly
  5. Hire a reliable moving company
  6. Save all the receipts related to your move
  7. Forward your mail right before you move
  8. Let your friends and family know you're moving
  9. Obtain a new driver's license when you arrive
  10. Take time to explore your new surroundings

Rochester is a fast-growing city that's teeming with culture, natural beauty and job opportunities. It encompasses a whole lot of open spaces and a little bit of big city. This city boasts almost non-existent crime, great schools, friendly people and easy access to any outdoor activity you could dream of. Who wouldn't want to move here?

What to do During a Storm

12/8/2019 (Permalink)

DURING THE STORM

  • Use a battery-operated NOAA Weather Radio for updates from local officials.
  • Avoid contact with corded phones. Use a corded telephone only for emergencies. Cordless and cellular telephones are safe to use.
  • Avoid contact with electrical equipment or cords.  Unplug appliances and other electrical items such as computers and turn off air conditioners.  Power surges from lightning can cause serious damage.
  • Avoid contact with plumbing. Do not wash your hands, do not take a shower, do not wash dishes, and do not do laundry.  Plumbing and bathroom fixtures can conduct electricity.
  • Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.
  • Do not lie on concrete floors and do not lean against concrete walls.
  • Avoid hilltops, open fields, the beach or a boat on the water.
  • Take shelter in a sturdy building. Avoid isolated sheds or other small structures in open spaces. 
  • Avoid contact with anything metal - tractors, farm equipment, motorcycles, golf carts, golf clubs, and bicycles.
  • If you are not driving, try to safely exit the roadway and park.  Stay in the vehicle and turn on the emergency flashers until the heavy rain ends. Avoid touching metal or other surfaces that conduct electricity in and outside the vehicle.

CALL US TODAY AT (585) 641-0040

SERVPRO of East Monroe County takes Pride in Work

12/8/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of South-East Monroe County has proudly been serving the Monroe County area, including Pittsford, East Rochester, Brighton, Henrietta, Mendon, and Rochester for over 38 years. In that time, we have gained the trust of hundreds of customers who have faced damage restoration needs due to water damage, fire damage, smoke and soot damage, and mold.

As an IICRC Certified Firm, SERVPRO of South East Monroe County IICRC certified technicians set themselves apart through training, experience, and comprehensive examination. An IICRC Certified Firm must first employ one or more IICRC certified technicians, and apply with the IICRC to become a Certified Firm. Certified Firms are the only cleaning, restoration and inspection companies listed in the IICRC locator. They also promise to adhere to the IICRC Code of Ethics, be current in their business insurance and licensee requirements, and can proudly display the IICRC logo on their company website and vehicles.

Our multiple five-star reviews across various review sites such as Yelp and Google show how seriously SERVPRO of South East Monroe County is dedicated to making it "Like it never even happened."

Call today for exceptional damage restoration service at (585) 641-0040!

What to do After a Storm Hits

12/7/2019 (Permalink)

AFTER THE STORM 

  • Never drive through a flooded roadway.
  • stay away from storm-damaged areas to keep from putting yourself at risk from the effects of severe thunderstorms.
  • Continue to listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or to local radio and television stations for updated information or instructions, as access to roads or some parts of the community may be blocked.
  • Help people who may require special assistance, such as infants, children and the elderly or those with access or functional needs.
  • Stay away from downed power lines and report them immediately.
  • Watch your animals closely.  Keep them under your direct control.
  • If you have storm damage to your home or property, call SERVPRO of S.E. Monroe County!  Timely mitigation is key to minimizing damage to your home and belongings.

CALL SERVPRO of S.E. Monroe County TODAY!! (585) 641-0040

What to do Immediately after a House Fire

12/7/2019 (Permalink)

  1. Ask whether it is safe to enter the home. Do not enter if the fire authorities deem it unsafe. They may establish a safety zone, but never assume a room is safe, until it has been cleared to enter.
  2. Know who to call.
    1. Contact family members and let them know you are safe, and unharmed.
    2. Contact your insurance agent. They will be able to talk you through the necessary steps, including proper documentation and emergency lodging and living expenses (keep all of your receipts!) The insurance company may assist in securing a company to help with clean up options.
    3. You may request SERVPRO at this time for contents cleaning, restoration etc. Contact SERVPRO.
    4. Another call may be to your landlord if applicable, and to your local American Red Cross. SERVPRO is the preferred restoration partner to The American Red Cross.
  3. Secure the property to prevent possible looting. SERVPRO is available to assist with securing property/board-ups.
  4. If water hoses were used to exterminate the fire, drying your home is critical. It is best to call the professionals at SERVPRO to do water/ fire cleanups. Water can lead to mold damage if not dried properly. SERVPRO is an approved restoration contractor for many major insurance carriers and adheres to the highest standards in the restoration industry.
  5. Seek counseling if needed. Children and adults can feel a traumatic sense of loss, and may need help to avoid a lasting sense of sadness and disorientation after a house fire. Don’t be afraid to reach out for help. A house fire is a traumatic event and individuals need to be treated with respect and compassion by those close to the process of rebuilding.

For more information on contents and structural drying, extinguisher residue and soot removal call SERVPRO at (585) 641-0040

Do's & Don'ts of Smoke Damage

12/6/2019 (Permalink)

Do:

  • Limit the movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpets.
  • Keeps hands clean, Soot on hands can further soil upholstery, walls and woodwork.
  • Place dry, colorfast towels on rugs, upholstery, and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator completely and prop doors open.
  • Clean soot from chrome on kitchen and bathroom faucets, trim and appliances and protect with a light coating of petroleum jelly or oil.
  • Pour RV antifreeze into sinks, toilet bowls and tubs if heat is off during freezing season.
  • Wash both sides of leaves on house plants.
  • Change HVAC filters.
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers to stop particles of soot from getting in or out of the HVAC system. 

Don't:

  • Attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces without first contacting SERVPRO of S.E. Monroe County!
  • Attempt to shampoo carpet or upholstered furniture without first consulting SERVPRO of S.E. Monroe County.
  • Attempt to clean any electrical appliances (TV, Radio, etc.) that may have been close to fire, heat or water without first contacting an authorized repair service.
  • Consume any canned or packaged food or beverages that may have been stored close to fire, heat or water. (they may be contaminated)
  • Turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet. Wiring may be wet or damaged.
  • Send garments to the dry cleaner. Improper cleaning may set smoke odor. 

Preventing Holiday Fires

12/5/2019 (Permalink)

Residential fires during the holiday season are more frequent, more costly, and more deadly than at any other time of the year. The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) reports more than double the number of open-flame fires on Christmas Day than on an average day, and about twice as many on New Year’s Day. And when those fires occur, they do more damage: Property loss during a holiday fire is 34% greater than in an average fire, and the number of fatalities per thousand fires is nearly 70% higher. When the source of the fire is a highly flammable Christmas tree, the toll in property and lives is even greater.

To keep your household from becoming a holiday fire statistic, here are some safety tips to follow.

Cooking

Cooking is the top cause of holiday fires, according to the USFA. The most common culprit is food that’s left unattended. It’s easy to get distracted; take a pot holder with you when you leave the kitchen as a reminder that you have something on the stove. Make sure to keep a kitchen fire extinguisher that’s rated for all types of fires, and check that smoke detectors are working. 

If you’re planning to deep-fry your holiday turkey, do it outside, on a flat, level surface at least 10 feet from the house.

Candles

The incidence of candle fires is four times higher during December than during other months. According to the National Fire Protection Association, four of the five most dangerous days of the year for residential candle fires are Christmas/Christmas Eve and New Year’s/New Year’s Eve. (The fifth is Halloween.)

To reduce the danger, maintain about a foot of space between the candle and anything that can burn. Set candles on sturdy bases or cover with hurricane globes. Never leave flames unattended. Before bed, walk through each room to make sure candles are blown out. For atmosphere without worry, consider flameless LED candles.

Christmas Trees

It takes less than 30 seconds for a dry tree to engulf a room in flames, according to the Building and Fire Research Laboratory of the National Institute for Standards and Technology. “They make turpentine out of pine trees,” notes Tom Olshanski, spokesman for the USFA. “A Christmas tree is almost explosive when it goes.” 

To minimize risk, buy a fresh tree with intact needles, get a fresh cut on the trunk, and water it every day. A well-watered tree is almost impossible to ignite. Keep the tree away from heat sources, such as a fireplace or radiator, and out of traffic patterns. If you’re using live garlands and other greenery, keep them at least three feet away from heating sources.

No matter how well the tree is watered, it will start to dry out after about four weeks, Olshanski says, so take it down after the holidays. Artificial trees don’t pose much of a fire hazard; just make sure yours is flame-retardant.

Decorative Lights

Inspect light strings, and throw out any with frayed or cracked wires or broken sockets. When decorating, don’t run more than three strings of lights end to end. “Stacking the plugs is much safer when you’re using a large quantity of lights,” explains Brian L. Vogt, director of education for holiday lighting firm Christmas Décor. Extension cords should be in good condition and UL-rated for indoor or outdoor use. Check outdoor receptacles to make sure the ground fault interrupters don’t trip. If they trip repeatedly, Vogt says, that’s a sign that they need to be replaced. 

When hanging lights outside, avoid using nails or staples, which can damage the wiring and increase the risk of a fire. Instead, use UL-rated clips or hangers. And take lights down within 90 days, says John Drengenberg, director of consumer safety for Underwriters Laboratories.  “If you leave them up all year round, squirrels chew on them and they get damaged by weather.”

Kids Playing with Matches

The number of blazes — and, tragically, the number of deaths — caused by children playing with fire goes up significantly during the holidays. From January through March, 13% of fire deaths are the result of children playing with fire, the USFA reports; in December, that percentage doubles. So keep matches and lighters out of kids’ reach. “We tend to underestimate the power of these tools,” says Meri-K Appy, president of the nonprofit Home Safety Council. “A match or lighter could be more deadly than a loaded gun in the hands of a small child.”

Fireplaces

Soot can harden on chimney walls as flammable creosote, so before the fireplace season begins, have your chimney inspected to see if it needs cleaning. Screen the fireplace to prevent embers from popping out onto the floor or carpet, and never use flammable liquids to start a fire in the fireplace. Only burn seasoned wood — no wrapping paper.

When cleaning out the fireplace, put embers in a metal container and set them outside to cool for 24 hours before disposal.